Seven Orishas from the Yoruba Pantheon

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Eleggua
Obatala
Oloddumare
Oshun
Oya
Yemalla
Shango

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This is just the beginning of our Dictionary. More information will come in the following weeks. ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Eleggua

The owner of the roads and opportunities. He is the messenger between human beings and the other orishas. He is always the first one to be honored during any ceremony because without his approval, nothing can be accomplished. Also a healer and master magician, he can be extremely generous as well as cruel. That's why he is associated with the devil in the Brazilian Candomble tradition. However, in the Yoruba tradition he is not seen as evil. His tricks are simply opportunities to learn lessons. He is the trickster. In Santeria, Eleggua is the one who protects the home against dangers. Most santeros keep him in the house close to the front door. They give him offerings every Monday and on the third day of the month. His favorite gifts are candies, candles, toys, rum and cigars.

Obatala

The orisha of peace, harmony and purity. He is the father of most orishas and the creator of humankind. He is the owner of the world. He represents clarity, justice and wisdom. Everything that is white on Earth belongs to him: the snow, the sky, the bones and the brain. In some paths, Obatala manifests as a female. Some people see him as an androgynous deity that contained both male and female energies representing respectively heaven and earth. Obatala is invoked for health, peace and harmony. An Altar to Obatala/Oxala

Oloddumare

The central creative force worshipped in the Yoruba tradition and in the Yoruba-based religions such as Santeria and Candomble. He is the concept of God.

Oshun

The goddess of love, sexuality, beauty and diplomacy. She is the owner of the sweet waters. With her sweetness, she overcomes the most difficult tasks. She is the protector of the abdominal area and the teacher of pleasure and happiness. She is a great giver, but when she is angry, it is very difficult to calm her down. She is often invoked in matters of love and money.

Oya

is the goddess of the wind, fire and the thunderbolt. As the female warrior of the Yoruba pantheon, she represents female power. She is strong, assertive, courageous and independent and is always willing to take risks. When she is enraged, she can create tornadoes and hurricanes, but these also happened when she is ready to make changes. Oya is a great witch and the guardian of the gates of death. She is invoked when there are serious illness or when transformation is necessary.

Yemalla

The goddess of the sea and the moon. She is the mother archetype and the provider of wealth. As the one who gives life and sustains the Earth, she is extremely generous and giving. She is the nurturing energy that sooth anyone. But like the ocean, when she is angry, she can be implacable. Therefore, she represents the mother who gives love, but does not give her power away. Yemaya is also the owner of the collective subconcious and ancient wisdom, since she holds the secrets that are hidden in the sea. She is often invoked in fertility rituals for women and in any ritual concerning women's issues.

Shango

Once the fourth king of Yoruba, and inmortalized as the thunder god, Shangє is legendary across the African Atlantic world. Shangє's storms and lightning bring a purifying moral terror encapsulated by the boldness and inmediacy of his art and altars. Shangє attracts many followers, as his entensive entourage represented on his altar.

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